Mixed Plaid Cheyenne Button-Up

This post is sponsored by JOANN. It may contain affiliate links but all words, reviews and opinions are my own.

Every single year I make a plaid flannel button up shirt. It’s become a fall tradition! When JOANN asked me if I could make something using their Plaiditude fabrics, I knew the tradition would continue on this year! I wanted to mix things up a little bit this time around and I came up with the idea of using a few different plaids from the very plentiful plaid JOANN line up to create a unique, mixed plaid button up shirt.

I had a lot of fun choosing the fabrics and deciding where to use each of the three plaids. When I finally decided, I laid all of the pieces together on the floor to get a rough idea of the finished look.

These are the three fabrics I used for my shirt:

White and Navy Plaid, Light Blue, Navy and Mustard Plaid, Mustard, Navy and White Plaid (found in store).

Buttons and Interfacing were also found at my local JOANN stores.

I used the Cheyenne Tunic pattern by Hey June. This was my third time sewing up this pattern. (One of my tried and true patterns!). I sewed up the size XS, and straightened out the side seams from the under arm to the hemline for a more oversized look. For the shirt front, I made/drew a line across the bodice 6 1/2″ down from the center front, and added an additional 1/2″ for the seam allowance along the cut edge. I also added 1/2″ for seam allowance along the top edge of the bottom of the shirt.

I also increased the pocket size and placed the pockets where I thought they looked best instead of the following the pattern markings. Lastly, I added 3/4″ in length to the shirt bodice front and back. No other changes were made.

This fabric was great to work with. Make sure to pay attention to grain-lines while cutting out your pieces when using plaid fabrics. It can be helpful to cut out one pattern piece at a time instead of two at a time so everything is straight!

I love the blended look of this shirt! It’s an easy top to throw on with jeans and yet adds a lot of fun to the entire outfit. Did I mention how cozy it is, too?! So. Cozy.

I love this shirt tucked in on one side, or tied up in a knot, too. It would even be cute layered with a t-shirt underneath or a cute jacket on top. I’m telling you, everyone (everywhere) needs a good button up shirt in their fall wardrobe!

Thanks for reading along! For fun, I’ve linked my past fall button up shirts here, here, here and here. Happy fall sewing!

Cheyenne with Pussy Bow Collar Hack

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Hey guys! Okay, if you’re part of the sewing community chances are you have heard of the Cheyenne Tunic by Hey June; your classic button up collared shirt pattern. (It also comes in a tunic version too). Recently while browsing through the mall a few weeks ago I saw a white and black window pane flannel button up shirt with a pussy bow collar. I loved the look and catalogued it in my mind under “things to make”. A week later, Allie from Indiesew added thee exact fabric to her shop. (Okay, I don’t know if it’s the EXACT fabric but it might as well be). I purchased the yardage needed, and got to work. (The fabric is currently sold out). In this post I’m going to walk you through how to take your cheyenne sewing pattern and add a pussy bow collar. I love how this version of the cheyenne pattern looks tucked into jeans, overalls, skirts, or even underneath dresses. There are a lot of wardrobe options with this top!

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Let’s get started!

Ookay bear with me, I kind of figured this out as I went along, but it turned out great.

For your collar pieces, you will need one rectangle that measures 22″ long by 5″ wide (the collar) and two rectangles cut on the BIAS measuring 25″ long by 5″ wide (the ties).

So first we need to attach the center front placket. Instead of leaving the top of the placket unfinished at the neckline, we need to finish it. Make sure to add a 1/2″ to the top of your placket pieces to allow us to do this. Before topstitching the collar on, fold the top of the placket right sides together and sew along the top at 1/2″ to enclose. Now you can topstitch around the whole placket. Unfortunately I didn’t take photos of this step, but this is how it should look:

*your neckline should be 1/2″ higher than your placket in order to sew the collar on. (Mine doesn’t look very good here, again I was figuring it out as I went along, don’t judge!).

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Continue along to step 25.

Next we need to prep the collar. Sew the tie pieces to either edge of the collar, right sides together at 1/2″. Press the seam open.

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Now, fold the tie in half, right sides together. I finished my ends with a slight slant. I used a marking pen to draw the slant on the wrong side of the fabric.

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Sew along the the edges at 1/2″, and along the slant at the ends. Obviously, you’ll want to end your slant about 1/2″ from the bottom point, don’t do what I did. Trim your seam, and clip into the neckline seam right before where your stitching started. Turn the ties right sides out. Press.

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Pin the outside of the collar piece to the right side of the neckline, and sew at 5/8″. (the inside collar edge should be free of the seam. Press the seam allowance towards the collar. Now, iron the inside collar raw edge in at 5/8″, and pin in place covering the stitches along the inside of the neckline.

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Now, flip the shirt back to the right side, and top stitch along the collar edge, removing pins as you go.

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There you have it! Not so bad, right?

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From there, finish the shirt as the pattern instructs. I shortened my shirt by 2″ so it would be easier to tuck the shirt in to my high waisted jeans. I noticed the Madewell top was also shorter too. I omitted the pockets as well. I usually cut my plackets and pockets on the bias (because it’s so much easier than pattern matching!), but this time I cut everything along the grain and pattern matched everything. Oh, one more thing. Don’t do what I did, and make sure to sew your sleeves onto the right sides. Oops. It’s not the first time either.

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I hope you enjoyed this tutorial, and found it helpful! Thanks for reading along, and happy sewing! I would love to see your cheyenne pussy bow collar hacks, make sure to tag me on Instagram @thesaraproject_ if you share!

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Cheyenne Tunic with Indiesew

 

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Every fall/ winter I aspire to sew up a button down (usually plaid) shirt. It’s such a great wardrobe staple, and something I reach for multiple times a week. This year I wanted to try the Cheyenne Tunic by Hey June Patterns.

Back in September I had the opportunity to meet up with some of my favorite sewing ladies in Denver for a little sewing retreat. It was here that the Cheyenne Tunic caught my eye. To be honest, I didn’t know it came with two views: tunic and button-down. I’d only ever known the pattern for it’s tunic style. As soon as Leslie and Adriana herself pointed out the button down option, I was sold. Allie from Indiesew brought a few fabric samples over to the house we were all staying out and took our fabric orders, and it was so fun to come home with this red and navy check fabric with the cheyenne tunic pattern too. Unfortunately, this fabric has since sold out from the Indiesew fabric shop.

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When I first found out I was expecting, I felt a little overwhelmed by the thought of maternity sewing. I didn’t know how I would feel energy wise, and quite how to alter clothing to fit an ever growing waistline. After a few months of trying it out, I’m feeling a lot more confident in my abilities. Everything has worked out to fit (and I don’t ever muslin!) so that’s saying a lot. I spent a lot of time thinking about how to alter the pattern to fit my baby bump, but also to keep it looking like the original design. I brought this pattern to a girls sewing night here in Utah, and Heather of Heather Feather has the genius idea to simply add a little extra ease to the waistline, slightly straightening out the side seam. SO I found my widest measurement on the pattern, and added 1/2″, and graded the rest of the side seam to match. There’s a lot of ease in this pattern, I based my measurements off of the finished measurement on the pattern, and ended up sewing a size small. I also added 3″ in length to the button placket, front and back bodice pieces.

You guys, I was so nervous it wasn’t going to work, but numbers don’t lie. It’s a great fit at 18 weeks pregnant with lot’s of room to grow (but without too much room).

**Update, now I’m 25 weeks and it still fits great. Photos taken at 18 weeks.

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I cut the center button placket, pockets and back yoke on the bias. Everyone always seems impressed by this but honestly it’s my way of having less pattern pieces to match. It kind of feels like cheating to be honest! It looks great, and I love the added contrast it adds. I also added 1/2″ around the pocket side and bottom edges to make them slightly bigger.

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The pattern itself was seamless to sew. The instructions were very clear, and everything came together very smoothly. I’m excited to take this one in slightly at the side seams and shorten the hem to make it work for fall next year too, after the baby comes. I’m really focused on making garments that work for both maternity and non-maternity this time around. So far, so good.

I have to add, my beanie (the Delia Beanie) is also a pattern in the Indiesew Shop! It’s great for gifting too! This particular one was made and gifted to me by Erin of Sewbon.

Thanks for reading along, and honestly, if you don’t own either of these patterns yet, you should! They’re wardrobe staples. Happy sewing!!

Phototography by Hello Little Fish.